VIDA offered educational programs in high-demand occupations—including health care, manufacturing, and technology—to individuals with low income.

VIDA offered educational programs in high-demand occupations—including health care, manufacturing, and technology—to individuals with low income.

VIDA supported full-time enrollment in educational programs, including certificate programs, associate’s degree programs, or the last two years of coursework to receive a bachelor’s degree related to occupations that pay a living wage and are in high demand in the program’s local area. Participants received intensive, mandatory weekly counseling services focused on developing life skills, such as time management and budgeting, as well as skills to support success in participants’ education programs. Individuals could also receive supportive services, including financial aid, connection to child care, transportation assistance, and emergency assistance, or could enroll in a 16-week basic skills remediation program. Most of the academic programs VIDA supports lasted one to two years. As of 2020, VIDA continues to offer similar services to eligible participants.

VIDA served individuals with a high school diploma or general education diploma who were low income, unemployed, underemployed, or who received public assistance. The program was implemented in five partnering colleges or universities in Lower Rio Grande Valley, TX. The Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education study also evaluated the following programs: Bridge to Employment in the Healthcare Industry, Carreras en Salud, Health Careers for All, Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training (I-BEST), Pathways to Healthcare, Patient Care Pathway Program, Workforce Training Academy Connect, and Year Up.

Year evaluation began: 2011
Populations and employment barriers: High school diploma or GED
Intervention services: Case management, Education, Supportive services, Training, Financial education, Occupational or sectoral training, Soft skills training
Setting(s): Tested in multiple settings

Effectiveness rating and effect by outcome domain

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Outcome domain Term Effectiveness rating Effect in 2018 dollars and percentages Effect in standard deviations Sample size
Increase earnings Short-term No evidence to assess support
Long-term No evidence to assess support
Very long-term No evidence to assess support
Increase employment Short-term No evidence to assess support
Long-term No evidence to assess support
Very long-term No evidence to assess support
Decrease benefit receipt Short-term No evidence to assess support
Long-term No evidence to assess support
Very long-term No evidence to assess support
Increase education and training All measurement periods Little evidence to assess support favorable 4% (in percentage points) 0.075 958

Effects over time by outcome domain

30
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Size and direction of effects
Services were delivered for 30 months
Moderate-to-large favorable effect Small favorable effect
No effect
Small unfavorable effect Moderate-to-large unfavorable effect
Hollow data points indicate average effects that may be due to chance.

Services were delivered for 30 months

Years since the start of service delivery Size of the effect on education and training
0.00
0.25
0.50
0.75
1.00
1.25
1.50
1.75
2.00 Small favorable effect 0.08
2.25
2.50
2.75
3.00
3.25
3.50
3.75
4.00
4.25
4.50
4.75
5.00

Participant race and ethnicity
Black or African American
1%
White
3%
Hispanic or Latino of any race
96%

Studies of this intervention

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Study quality rating Study counts per rating
High High 1